Teaching Games as Journalism: Pedagogy and Practice

Presentation to the NSF C-PATH Distributed Expertise Colloquium, Villanova University, June 3, 2013 A guide the acronyms and some other helpful references: JPW- journalism/professional writing major at The College of New Jersey IMM – interactive multimedia program at TCNJ DE – C-PATH Distributed Expertise project NSF Award Abstract Wolz’ Simple Storyteller

On teaching game design in a journalism course, part 2

In my last post on the newsgames course I will be teaching this fall, I began to discuss how the need to respect the journalistic intent of a newsgame translates into requirements and constraints upon the game’s design and production. In this post, I want to  delve into that topic more deeply, using principles outlined […]

The Food Stamp Game: a test case for teaching computational journalism, part 1

This fall, I am teaching a class, “Serious Games for News, ” in which journalism and interactive multimedia students will analyze and design various examples of “newsgames.”  In their book,  Newsgames: Journalism at Play(MIT Press, 2010) Ian Bogost and his colleagues use the term Newsgames to mean, broadly, using game design techniques to “do” journalism […]

Sidebar: Learning about learning – a conversation with Deborah Tatar

Deborah Tatar is a cognitive scientist at Virginia Polytechnic University whose current research focuses on understanding and clearing the obstacles to student learning in mathematics and science. For example, she was a principal investigator on the SimCalc project, a software-based interactive math curriculum for middle schoolers that has shown demonstrable success when accompanied by professional […]

What is a computational journalist?

A friend posed this question on Facebook in response to my last blog post, and I was tempted to respond, “We’re still figuring it out.” Then I was tempted to be glib and say, “It’s CAR (computer assisted reporting) on the Information Superhighway.” There’s a sense in which both of these statements are true, and yet, there are some things that can be said with some degree of confidence.

When artists and scientists collide: Steve Harrison on collaboration

Steve Harrison is an architect by training whose work in academia and industry has crossed into engineering, computer science and interactive media. He is also a provocative thinker about the value of cross-disciplinary collaboration in research and teaching. Steve is also my co-PI on the CPATH Distributed Expertise Project funded by the National Science Foundation. […]

Electricity for Haiti: Wisdom from Africa

Not surprisingly, a dearth of electrical power is one of the major obstacles to rescue and recovery efforts in Haiti.  While rescuers struggle to get emergency power in place, I’m thinking that low-tech inventions coming out of Africa might be helpful. For years, Afrigadget.com has been tracking such inventions for years. Here are a few […]

Distributed Expertise in Enhancing Computing Education With Connections to the Arts

I’ve written quite a bit about my work on the IJIMS project, but it’s not my only major research project. I’m also co-PI on another exciting NSF-funded project (Award #0829616) that involves creating model curricula and resources that connect computer science education with other disciplines. The formal name of the project is Distributed Expertise in […]